The Mancunion

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Introduction to the Warehouse Project

Now in its fifth year, Manchester institution that is the Warehouse Project hardly needs an introduction. But so wide is its appeal, and so significant…

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Now in its fifth year, Manchester institution that is the Warehouse Project hardly needs an introduction. But so wide is its appeal, and so significant its place on the UK music calendar, that discussion of the year’s hottest music event is unavoidable.

What better way to celebrate the birthday of something revered by so many than with what is undoubtedly the finest gathering of musicians ever to have graced one small stage in the bowels of Picadilly Station. Everything about Warehouse Project screams unique, from its seedy location and slightly sinister atmosphere, to the multiplicity of punters that it attracts.

The success of WHP over the last year few years has given its organisers a certain amount of authority when it comes to cherry-picking the seasons’ headliners, as the event attracts the finest talent from across the world. But it is not just the variety, or quality, of acts that is so remarkable; only Warehouse Project has the audacity to place 80s hip-hop legend Grandmaster Flash on the same bill as D’n’B DJs Chase & Status (see Saturday 23rd October). And where else would you find local indie band Doves perform alongside Mike Pickering, one of the founding fathers of the Manchester acid house scene (see Saturday 16th October), as if it were the most natural thing in the world?

Sam Kandel, one of the founders of The Warehouse Project, explains that: “We believe we have put together the 5th anniversary’s season to embody what The Warehouse Project is all about. There’s so much good music out there and we have sought to bring as much of it as possible to Store Street. There’s the increased emphasis on live shows but also we have put together some huge DJ events – it’s a really diverse mix of shows each week. We can’t wait to get started!”

The hype surrounding this years event has been reflected in ticket sales – six nights have already sold out, and not a single flyer on Oxford Road in sight! However, tickets for most nights are available from selected outlets, including: Eastern Bloc Records (Oldham Street), Picadilly Records (Oldham Street), Font (Fallowfield), Trof (Fallowfield), and Londis (Hathersage Road). Tickets are also available online, subject to booking fee. See www.thewarehouseproject.com for full lineup and more information.

Eoghan Bennett, Music Editor