The Mancunion

Britain's biggest student newspaper, serving Greater Manchester

Epic Mickey 2: The Power of Two

Can Disney live up to expectations with Epic Mickey 2?

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Epic Mickey 2 comes as a multi-platform sequel to the Nintendo Wii original Epic Mickey, released in 2010. The game centres on co-operative play between returning hero Mickey Mouse and Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. Using the magic paintbrush and a remote control, this unlikely duo is reunited to help rebuild and defend Wasteland from a mysterious evil.

The story moves forward with enjoyable cut scenes and cheery musical numbers in case you ever forgot this was a Disney production. Friends and foes from the original game appear, with the main antagonist, the Mad Doctor, persuading Oswald that he’s seen the error of his ways and wants to help restore the cartoon world which has been wracked by earthquakes and Blotlings. Oswald’s girlfriend, Ortensia, is not so convinced, working together with the Gremlin game guide Gus to bring back Mickey Mouse.

The main story has both single and co-op modes, though the game is clearly intended to be played co-operatively. The in game instructions for Oswald caused some confusion to start, with no explicit reference to the fact that AI will pick up these controls rather than being able to swap between the two, I was often left wondering whether all aspects of the game could be completed as a solo act. Co-operative play has been well received, and is certainly the ideal way to play it though.

There are collectables and side quests to entertain while you work your way through a simple storyline, including options for design customisation, as well as the idea of being able to choose a path of destruction, or a path of resurrection through the dual powers of the magic paintbrush and its thinner or paint modes.

The camera angles leave a lot to be desired, making game play a little frustrating at times with a limited field of vision in third person and a fixed camera angle for first person (used as part of a quest to take photos throughout the game). With such a vivid game design, the natural instinct is to look around and explore every little nook and crannies, which makes the camera particularly annoying.

Overall, it’s a fun platform adventure with the quirk of an enjoyable story told through music that’s sadly hampered by frustrating camera angles.