The Mancunion

Britain's biggest student newspaper

I am vegan on a mission

In collaboration with PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), Matthew Perry gives advice on the best vegan food in town

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An impressive one in five young people now identify as vegetarian or vegan, proving that plant-based eating has thoroughly infiltrated the mainstream—and couldn’t be easier as well! Since the benefits include better skin, a reduced risk of developing cancer and a clearer conscience knowing that you’re sparing animals the terror of the abattoir, it’s no wonder that notable celebs, including David Haye and Ellie Goulding, are thriving on a vegan diet.

If you still haven’t tried one of Manchester’s many vegan-friendly spots, get yourself over to one of these top picks:

V Revolution is vegan junk-food heaven. Located in the Northern Quarter, this 100 per cent cruelty-free retro American-style diner serves up juicy burgers, “cheesy” hot dogs and mouth-watering cakes at decent rates. It’s almost too good to be true – which means it’s certainly not to be missed.

– Not only is Teatime Collective an all-vegan ice-cream parlour (as if that weren’t enough), it also offers a mean vegan breakfast and savoury treats like “steak” and chips.

– Healthy, tasty and inexpensive can be difficult to find, but Go Falafel in Piccadilly and Rusholme has you covered. Wash down a falafel wrap with a Blueberry Blush smoothie.

– Easy-peasy vegan-cheesy! Dough Pizza Kitchen is an artisan pizza restaurant in the Northern Quarter offering mouth-watering dairy-free cheese pizzas. They even do takeaway orders for those nights in.

– If you’re in Withington, have a relaxed evening or recharge your batteries at Fuel Café Bar. This vegetarian café and music venue is a treat for your taste buds. Highlights include the chilli burrito and the chocolate and hazelnut brownie.

The 8th Day is a vegetarian café and food co-op on Oxford Road, near to MMU. Stock up on ethical groceries and cleaning products, while you feast on delicious soups, stews, smoothies and cakes—not forgetting to get a treat or two from their in-store bakery (offering bread, wraps, sweet snacks and pies) on your way out!

Of course, you don’t even need to seek out speciality cafés to get something good to eat whilst out and about. Increased demand for vegan options means that you can eat vegan just about anywhere. Wetherspoons’ sweet potato and chickpea curry, PizzaExpress’ Pianta pizza, and Giraffe’s tapenade and meze—as well as several dishes in various restaurant and bars in the Northern Quarter—are just the tip of the iceberg. The next step can often just involve a simple case of asking if the café or restaurant can whip up or alter a dish for you!

If you’re interested in giving vegan eating a go, check out the guidelines for a vegan Tradition English Breakfast below to see how easy it is to cook vegan at home. You can also order PETA’s free vegan starter kit at peta.org.uk/vsk which provides you with recipes, advice and so much, or even take the Vegan Society’s 30 day pledge!

The Vegan’s Traditional English Breakfast
Serves 3
Cost: £2-£2.50 per person
1 Can of Baked Beans
To cook using a microwave or stove for a few minutes

1 Pack of Linda McCartney’s Vegetarian Sausages
To cook for 10-15 minutes using a preheated oven, grill or even in a frying pan

300g of Closed Cup Mushrooms
Chop and fry in a large saucepan whilst cooking the ‘Scrambled Egg’

3 large tomatoes
Chop in half and grill

1 pack of Hash browns
To cook using an oven or grill

Toast with vegan margarine (purchasable at any major supermarket)

For the ‘Scrambled Egg’

-Firm Tofu (200g)
-1 or 2 teaspoons of English Mustard
-1/2 teaspoon of salt
-1/2 teaspoon of black pepper
-1/2 teaspoon of parsley, tarragon or dill
-1 or 2 tablespoons of water

Prepare the ‘Scrambled Egg’ by pressing the water from the tofu and draining it before placing the tofu in a bowl to mash. Once mashed into small pieces place into a preheated non-stick saucepan with a little oil in and cook. Leave the tofu to brown for 5 minutes, turning occasionally, while you mix the rest of the ingredients together in a jug and stir to form a liquid sauce. Taste and adjust to preference. Once the tofu has cooked, dribble the sauce over the top and mix it in, ensuring it spreads over all the tofu. Leave to cook for several more minutes and serve with the rest of your breakfast.

 

Bon appetit!

  • Beefeater

    You know most people who eat meat don’t do so simply because of a lack of knowledge. Most people simply don’t believe that it’s unethical to kill animals for meat. Ethics is a human creation after all.
    If you died at home, your dog would eat you. (I’m assuming you have a dog, vegans usually do)

    • Karim Pardayev

      They don’t feel that it is wrong to kill anybody anything And even do not thinks about it, since it is normal for their culture. / because as i remember i even didn’t think about being vegeterian or vegan. But one day my brother became vegeterian and i felt that it is wierd and his health will worsen/ lots of arguments canines millions years of evolution etc. and after about half a year i became a vegeterian /it was in 2016 Okt . before that i started to fell that i do sth wrong or why i have problems with my digestion ))) . Then i wanted to become a vegeterian gradually but after half of a day on youtube i couldn’t be a meat eater any more/