The Mancunion

Britain's biggest student newspaper

Features

JessTennessee

All abroad!

Interested in travelling? Want to escape those winter month Curry Mile traffic jams, where you wonder if you’ll ever feel anything but bitterness for the world again? Well study abroad might just be for you. Have a look and see how these people got on with their first-hand tales.

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On the shoulders of giants

Richard Crook looks at the origins of our building names. Who are the people being honoured by Manchester and why?

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Anti-social networking

Could you be sabotaging your job prospects or potential relationships before even saying a word? Richard Crook looks at ‘self-branding’ in the world of social networking.

A city worth exploring

What could possibly go wrong?

It may seem incredibly important to get everything right in Welcome Week, but university is about trial and error. You shouldn’t worry about making silly mistakes.

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Locked Out

Last December, the UK Borders Agency began a process of consultation on the issue of student immigration into Britain. The policies that have come from this consultation are likely to have far reaching effects. This means a major overhaul of the student visa system. Anjelique Stevenson-Taylor draws from her own experience, and explains why the measures being proposed are damaging both for Britain and for her fellow international students.

As you may well know, thousands of people from abroad depend upon special visas in order to live here in the UK. People from all over the world travel to the UK for everything, from business trips, for holidays, to be with their loved ones, or to further their education. In order to receive a visa, we have to go through the nightmare of gathering all relevant documents and proof that you can pay, and send these off to the nearest UK Borders Agency home offices whilst waiting with bated breath. If you manage to get through, then kudos, if not, you’ve just wasted many weeks of your life, and that’s not including the hundreds of dollars, euros, or yen to get here.

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The symphony of lights

Thinking of studying in Hong Kong? Don’t forget your business card, as Gareth Lewis guides us through the rich student life of the harbour city….

1 Canal Tunnel, Rochdale Canal at Ancoats. By Nicholas Bojdo WEB COPY

Canal streets

The words ‘Canal’ and ‘Manchester’ may nowadays be most associated with a famous street, but 250 years ago they became synonymous with the dawn of a new era in Britain. The world at that time was changing dramatically, as pioneers of new technology invented machines that would bring the fruits of manual labour to the wider world and propel standards of living to levels beyond imagination.

Mancunion Photo Editor, Nicholas Bojdo

The words ‘Canal’ and ‘Manchester’ may nowadays be most associated with a famous street, but 250 years ago they became synonymous with the dawn of a new era in Britain. The world at that time was changing dramatically, as pioneers of new technology invented machines that would bring the fruits of manual labour to the wider world and propel standards of living to levels beyond imagination. Between 1740 and 1901 the population increased fivefold thanks to improved living conditions, sanitation and healthcare. During that time the urban landscape of Manchester changed considerably, thanks in part to the emergence of a new transport system: the Canal.

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Illegal arrests in Iran

Sara Azadi interviews Rev. Sam Yeghnazar about the imprisonment of Christians in Iran. Rev. Sam Yeghnazar is one of the oldest Christian Iranian Leaders and has been working with hundreds of Iranian church leaders for the last 50 years.

Hillel Steiner Web Quality

The Big Idea: Hillel Steiner on Left-libertarianism

“When I started teaching, if students got a bad essay mark they apologised to the tutor. Today, when students get bad marks there’s a chance they will come to see the tutor with their lawyer in tow”.

University of Manchester professor Hillel Steiner is a world-renowned thinker on matters of political theory.

Features Editor Nick Renaud-Komiya met up with him to chew the fat on Libertarianism, politics and the state of higher education. Here’s how they got on.

Do you have the right to the fruits of your talents? This seems like a simple question. Yet, people have gone to war over this question; those who say ‘yes’ have fought those who say ‘no’. Libertarianism? Socialism? Communism? All of these ‘-isms’ are essentially attempts to answer this question in one way or another. Are you and you alone the arbiter of your lot in life? Or do you have a duty to help others and they you?

Marks: 'The last thing I want is to hang around with a bunch of political wankers'

Britain’s best loved drug smuggler – an interview with Howard Marks

The proud former leader of a hashish trafficking empire talks about legalising cannabis and eating dog food

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What are the alternatives?

With the results of the government’s Comprehensive Spending Review now published, Sarah McCulloch considers potential alternatives to the impending spending cuts. From getting rid of…

One theory is that active left-wing students tend to smoke, so are less inclined to take action

Do student ethics go up in smoke when it comes to tobacco companies?

The National Union of Students has a £5.5m tobacco habit, is this why students don’t campaign against cigarette companies?