The Mancunion

Britain's biggest student newspaper

Archives

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

What’s On for Literature Lovers: November

A few events around Manchester for literature lovers, this November

Photo: Heyday Films

Review: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

JK Rowling begins a new era of magic with the highly-anticipated prequel

Photo: Hannah Foy

Review: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child has claimed its place as the play of the year — it is quite simply magic

Photo: Manchester University Quidditch Club

A student life: the quidditch player

We spoke to Livi Dickinson about being a quidditch player at university

Photo: Warner Bros

You Can’t Handle the Truth! – Book to Film Adaptations

Andriana Hambi thinks that novels should stay on the page.

Plenty of fish in the literary sea... Photo: N Bojdo

How not to read: An epiphany

Elizabeth Mitchell explores when to give up on an unmanageable book

fault-in-our-stars-poster

Preview: The Fault in our Stars

Matt previews the much anticipated adaptation of John Green’s best-selling teen drama

Harry Potter

All I want for Christmas …

Dearest, darling Santa Clause. All I want for Christmas is …

Top 5 Evil Blondes

You might be under the impression that blondes have the most fun. Well, whilst they might be having the most fun, Cinema indicates they often cause the most trouble. Forget Thor and Luke Skywalker. From slimy Slytherins to homoerotic Dench-killers, slick golden locks can mean trouble…

House of the Spirits, by Isabel Allende

Book Club: Celia Mullins, History Student

Celia Mullins talks to Book Club about House of the Spirits, the Isabel Allende classic, visceral prose, and Meryl Streep

Rivers of London, (Gollancz, 2011)

Rivers of London, Ben Aaronovitch – review

Ben Aaronovitch’s fantasy/crime world offers some much-needed respite as dissertation deadlines and exam period draw ever closer

The Tiger Who Came to Tea, by Judith Kerr. A personal childhood favourite of mine.

Escape in a children’s story

Remember how fun reading was when you were a kid? Joelle Jefferis advocates reigniting the adventure