The Mancunion

Britain's biggest student newspaper

Archives

Photo: Ben Morse

Review: 2000 Trees Festival 2017

Did I mention you can bring your own alcohol into the arena?!

Photo: 2000 Trees festival

Preview: 2000 Trees Festival

Hannah Brierley takes a look at one of the UK’s most promising festivals

photo: press shot

Interview: Christina Martin

Canadian singer-songwriter Christina Martin chats to Rebekah Shaw about her upcoming UK tour, stripped-down shows, and the social responsibility of music artists

Photo: album artwork

Live: The Amazons

The Amazons’ triumphant performance at sold out Deaf Institute leaves the audience eagerly anticipating their return, writes Amy Matthews

Photo: Hannah Brierley

Live: The Orielles

“Despite their young age they are all really making ripples in the music world”

Photo: album artwork

Album: Wire — Silver/Lead

Wire’s latest record is another excellent example of what they’ve always done — being impressively odd, writes Jacob Bernard-Banton

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Chuck Berry: Rock and Roll pioneer

In his memory, Tara Bharadia looks over the career and impact of the groundbreaking songwriter

Photo: album artwork

Tracks of the Week: 27th March

This week brings new releases from both well established and upcoming artists. Despite it being the beginning of spring, across all tracks darkness certainly prevails, writes Amy Matthews

Photo: album artwork

Record Reappraisal: John Lennon — Plastic Ono Band

Nick Jeyarajah looks back on John Lennon’s solo debut, a painful and raw record that establishes a new identity for the former Beatle

Photo: villunderlondon @Flickr

Live: Mitski

Despite an uncertain start, Mitski pulls another powerful performance out of the bag

Photo: Morgan Sinclair

Interview: Tall Ships

Ahead of their upcoming show and album, Calum Pinder speaks to Tall Ships frontman Ric Phethean about what the band have been up to and what to expect next

Photo: album artwork

Album: The Orwells — Terrible Human Beings

Their consistency is remarkable, but on album number three The Orwells’ determinedness to stick to their guns sees them shoot themselves in the foot, writes Callum Oliver