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18th September 2012

Must See This Week In Theatre: 24th Sept-1st Oct

The best of theatre for the week ahead.
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TLDR

The Country Wife

 Restoration comedy ‘The Country Wife’s’ sexual content was so scandalous that it was banned for 200 years. Now a classic, the play promises a riotous evening of seduction and temptation!

Runs until Saturday 20th October at The Royal Exchange. Student tickets £5

 

The Heretic

The Library Theatre Company returns to the Lowry with on Thursday with Richard Bean’s new play, The Heretic. A fresh and relevant comedy exploring climate change and the validity of research surrounding it.

Runs until Saturday 13th October at The Royal Exchange. Tickets £10-£12

 

Sister Act

Based on the 1992 film of the same name, this musical about a disco diva’s experiences as a nun hiding from gangster visits Manchester as part of its UK tour. The music is inspired by Motown, funk, soul and disco and has received rave reviews!

Runs from Tue 25th September to Sat 6th October at the Manchester Opera House. Tickets £15.00-£45.50

 

Lost and Found Festival

Supported by the Contact Theatre, Lost and Found is a series of pop-up art and performances in public spaces around Manchester and Salford. The performances take place alongside everyday life so but do check out the Contact website to find out about individual performances.

Runs from Wednesday 26th September until Friday 28th September at various locations. The performances are free. 

 


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42 Balloons review: An inspiring musical about dreams, sacrifices and a lawn chair

Charlie McCullagh’s and Evelyn Hoskins’ elevated chemistry blew us away

Urinetown: The Musical review – UMMTS doesn’t piss about

UMMTS once again fails to disappoint. Urinetown, despite its name, is a delight (GASP!)

Hedda review: A misguided imitation of Ibsen’s masterpiece

Contact hosts Here to There Productions’ for a version of Hedda Gabler that is almost as painful as a genuine gunshot wound

My Beautiful Laundrette review: Nationalism, racial tensions, and political turmoil

Lacking a fresh political perspective, entertaining with classic tunes and compelling design, My Beautiful Laundrette takes stage at The Lowry