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22nd February 2014

Herbal Teas: Love them or hate them?

The herbal tea revolution: a health and taste sensation, or is it no substitute for a proper cuppa?
Herbal Teas: Love them or hate them?

We are often being told that coffee isn’t good for us, filling us with caffeine to make us more alert then leaving us frustrated when we can’t sleep. Tea is quintessentially British and a perfect accompaniment to almost any kind of cake, but there is a whole world beyond Breakfast, Yorkshire, and PG Tips.

Herbal and fruit teas are now gaining much more popularity, and as a self-confessed tea geek I can see why. Firstly, there are so many different kinds so you will never get bored! They are also incredibly quick to make, popping the tea bag in a hot water and ditching it a couple of minutes is far easier than rummaging around for milk and sugar only to discover you have none and you have to go to the shop. They also claim to have many benefits. Camomile, is thought to calm you whilst peppermint can aid digestion, ginger tea can curb the feeling of nausea—useful for those hangover days, and let’s not get started on the supposed endless good qualities green tea can bring! Herbal teas can also be drunk cold having a cooling refreshing effect.

However, it’s not all great news. Herbal tea drinkers can be seen as fussy, not everyone houses a fanciful selection of teas for you to choose from; they don’t give you the same energy boost as an Americano and they don’t satisfy your sweet tooth like a hot chocolate or go with a biscuit quite as well as your average cup of tea. They’re also not really a ‘guy thing’ and apparently you would need to let the teabag brew for up to 10 minutes and be drinking at least 4 cupful’s of the stuff a day to really feel the benefits which seems like a lot of effort to get your health kick! And yes, maybe sometimes they do smell a lot better than they actually taste but shh! Whether you like them or not, it’s an excuse for a break from work though right?

Tea for the skin:

Rooibos contains anti-oxidant properties. This tea is supposed to help with skin concerns such as eczema and rosea.

Tea for the mind:

Known for its calming properties camomile tea is made from flowers and is considered a natural sedative to help relax the mind, ease anxiety, and encourage sleep.

Tea for the body:

Peppermint tea is thought to aid digestion reducing bloating after a meal. It is easy to create your own by adding fresh mint leaves to hot water for 10 minutes, adding sugar for sweetness or lemon for sourness—bit like a virtuous mojito.

Tea for the days when you just don’t feel well:

Ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory and the warmth of the tea can help to increase circulation and reduce the feeling of nausea.

Rosemary-Mint Tea. Lindsey Goodwin
Rosemary-Mint Tea.
Lindsey Goodwin

 


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