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27th June 2015

Best of: Pangaea – Disco Apocalypse

At the end of the world, what’s left to do but party with the disco zombies? Here are some of our favourite costumes from this summer’s Pangaea
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TLDR

June’s Pangaea event was an enormous success, with over 6500 revellers turning out to celebrate the sounds of the Seventies like it was the end of the world. As ever, partygoers had clearly put in a huge amount of time and effort into their costumes, and whether disco diva or horror hippie, the range of outfits was, yet again, mindblowing. The Mancunion was out documenting the apocalypse, and photographing some of the most inventive and eye-catching outfits. In no particular order, here are some of the best we saw.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All photos: The Mancunion

 

Check out the gallery of Pangaea photos on our Facebook page!


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