The Mancunion

Britain's biggest student newspaper

What is your course stereotype?

What does your degree say about you? Kitty Treverton Jones explores the stereotypes from a selection of university courses

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Medicine—There are two kinds of medics: The ones that work super hard and never go out, and the ones who work hard and go out ALL THE TIME. Most of the latter group would not be your first choice of future doctor, but who really cares because they throw the best toga parties.

Politics—Politics students have an opinion about everything and they take it as a personal insult if you don’t vote.

Philosophy—Slightly aloof, they can’t really give you a good reason why they chose to study philosophy or where it will take them in the future, but if Freud comes up in a pub quiz there is no one else you’d rather have by your side.

Physics—Physicists think of themselves as far superior to both Biology (who they think just sit in lectures singing The Bad Touch) and Chemistry (whose degree consists solely of learning the periodic table). They have already seen The Theory of Everything 12 times and The Big Bang Theory is the source of all their comedy.

Pharmacy—For those who weren’t clever enough to do medicine, pharmacy is a scientific alternative that gets you a good job and a stable career. They know too much about medicinal drugs to ever take illegal ones.

Engineering— They know the country needs them and are slightly smug about the fact they’re guaranteed to earn loads of money. They also adore going bowling and discussing how bridges stay up.

History—History students spend the vast amount of free time they have doing essays/socialising in Blue 3, looking down on everyone who doesn’t know how to reference because they were taught it from day one.

Geography—Moving on from the school stereotype of colouring in with crayons, students who study geography at degree level have been given more responsibility and are now allowed to use felt tip pens. They’re not sure what to do with all this power, so avoid university altogether by taking 20 credit holidays to Malta.

Languages—They chose their degree for the year abroad and never shut up about it. You will find them in the language centre watching foreign films and complaining about people who assume they are going to become teachers.

Art History—Made up of blonde girls from the south, they spend their university career trying to assure everyone History of Art is a proper degree.