emilywain
4th October 2018

Review: Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again!

Emily Wain reviews Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again, which is a positive sing-along throughout
Review: Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again!
Photo: Eva Rinaldi @Wikimedia Commons

With an even larger star-studded cast than our first visit to the gorgeous Greek island of Kalokairi; Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again delivers on its long awaited promise of a feel good, sing-along worthy experience.

While the first film was loved by many in 2008, it was also criticised for being too clichéd lacking a plausible storyline. Ten years later, the director Ol Parker has succeeded in providing fans, and converting more, with her thought-provoking and gripping story. Amanda Seyfried, who plays Sophie, even described the film as “quite sad and emotional at some points” during an interview on This Morning. The film is intermingled with famous ABBA favourites, providing the joy that leaves audiences wanting to watch it again.

As we begin eating our popcorn, we are transported into 1979 where Sophie’s mother, Donna, played by Lily James, is giving a graduation speech to her peers, which inevitably turns into a sing-song and a party. Throughout the entirety of the film, scenes flick between the life of 25 year old Sophie in the present and looking back on the life of her late mother Donna at that same age.

Viewers can see all the returning cast acting and singing alongside new additions, who play the younger versions of the main characters, such as the old and young version of Rosie, played by Julia Walters and Alexa Davies. Many moviegoers are even left blushing at the handsomeness of young Bill Anderson, played by Josh Dylan – even in those crazy 1970’s inspired costumes.

Those extra keen members of the ABBA Fan Club can also see former ABBA member Björn Ulvaeous make an appearance in random scenes throughout. His involvement in the film is praised as we discover he suggested and re-worded his favourite, yet lesser-known ABBA songs such as ‘My Love, My Life’ and ‘I’ve been waiting for you’ to fit with the film.

Despite the light-heartedness of this musical, viewers can feel emboldened by the positive messages within the film. These include feeling free just like a ‘dancing queen’. Furthermore, Lily James has also remarked about the sex-positive message during an interview with Cosmopolitan. The non-judgemental tone throughout helps to de-stigmatise this topic and make women feel more comfortable. As the majority of viewers are female, arguably, Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again could be seen as a movie about and in favour of female empowerment.

The next time you need cheering up or a good time, go and watch this ‘Super Trooper’ of a film.

4/5.


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