Skip to main content

francesca-lawson
25th November 2013

Feeding freshers for under a fiver

So you’re settling in to student life now, no doubt becoming accustomed to Sainsbury’s discount shelf and piercing the film of the microwave meal. Could be worse right? But there’s nothing quite like a decent home cooked meal. Forget all the excuses, “I can’t be bothered”, “fresh produce is too expensive”, “I’ve not got time”, […]
Categories:
TLDR

So you’re settling in to student life now, no doubt becoming accustomed to Sainsbury’s discount shelf and piercing the film of the microwave meal. Could be worse right? But there’s nothing quite like a decent home cooked meal.

Forget all the excuses, “I can’t be bothered”, “fresh produce is too expensive”, “I’ve not got time”, there is a way to eat well on a budget – communal cooking.

Communal cooking involves getting a group together and sharing the daunting task of preparing a hearty meal. You’ve heard the saying ‘many hands make light work’? That’s exactly the idea. If you’ve only just moved in, rope in your flatmates! Cooking a meal together is a great way to bond; you’ll learn how to work with and round each other in an often small kitchen, plus you’ll get to share the delicious results. And as you’ll be living with people from a variety of backgrounds and cultures, you’ll get the opportunity to widen your culinary horizons.

It is possible to cook without breaking the bank. The proof? Steak night, Sunday Lunch and a Chinese banquet all came in at under £2 per head. A simple tip: don’t be fussy! For example, a value range joint of meat – provided it’s cooked well – tastes just the same as any other. Moreover, draining the juices after cooking can be used as a base to make an accompanying sauce. Ingredients might seem expensive, but dividing the cost between the group minimises this, and the end result is definitely worth it.

Cocktail Class

So you’ve had your delicious home cooked dinner, and you’re getting ready to go out. Wow everyone at pre-drinks with this original cocktail invention: The Bakewell Martini.

You’ll need a cocktail shaker, a strainer, a muddler (or alternatively a wooden spoon will suffice) and plenty of vodka, amaretto and raspberries.

Muddle the raspberries in the bottom of a cocktail shaker. As the raspberries essentially serve as a mixer, the quantities are at your discretion. Raspberries are predominantly a late summer and autumnal fruit, so for a seasonal variation, swap the raspberries for cranberries and finish with a touch of cinnamon.

Add 50mls of vodka and 25mls of amaretto to the shaker, along with a handful of ice, and close it. Shake well for at least 30 seconds, keeping a firm hold on the lid to avoid spillages. After this, remove the lid, tap the bottom of the shaker against a surface to even it out, and strain into Martini glasses. Pop a few more berries in the glass to garnish, and serve. A delicious cocktail to get everyone in the party mood.

Fact: There’s a lot of dispute over what can and can’t be identified as a Martini. As ‘Martini’ is the name of the traditional cocktail glass, this qualifies as a Martini, despite containing no ‘Martini’ brand Vermouth.


More Coverage

Manchester Camp of Resistance disruption spreads across campus

An instagram post by MLA shows protestors occupying University Place, the same day that the encampment spread onto the Alan Gilbert square

Students and public display solidarity with student occupation in face of police presence

Protesters and police gathered outside the building on May 27, but the occupation remains on-going

65% of UoM’s electricity demand to be supplied by new solar farm deal

As part of the University of Manchester’s goal of zero carbon emissions by 2038, a new contract has been signed which meets 65% of the University’s electricity demand with clean, renewable electricity

Tickets for ‘Alive! Festival: Solstice’ out now

The student-run event will be “taking over the SU” on June 6, with 5 stages and 30 student artists