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Rewind: This week in music history

Hannah Brierley takes you back to look through some of the music worlds highs and lows of the past in this week in music history

Photo: Vimeo

Review: Baby Driver

An exhilarating ride with a fantastic soundtrack to match

Photo: 2000 Trees festival

Preview: 2000 Trees Festival

Hannah Brierley takes a look at one of the UK’s most promising festivals

photo: press shot

Interview: Christina Martin

Canadian singer-songwriter Christina Martin chats to Rebekah Shaw about her upcoming UK tour, stripped-down shows, and the social responsibility of music artists

Photo: Fuse TV

‘Hey Nancy, leave teachers alone!’

Students and staff join force in a music-led protest against the 171 impending job cuts at the University of Manchester

Photo: album artwork

Competition: Win Marika Hackman limited edition vinyl and signed postcard

Mancunion readers are in with a chance to win an exclusive vinyl edition of Marika Hackman’s new album, as well as a signed personalised postcard

Photo: album artwork

Album: Mac DeMarco — This Old Dog

Mac DeMarco finally grows up, delivering a low-key album full of his most introspective and accomplished songwriting to date

Photo: album artwork

Live: The Amazons

The Amazons’ triumphant performance at sold out Deaf Institute leaves the audience eagerly anticipating their return, writes Amy Matthews

Photo: Hannah Brierley

Live: The Orielles

“Despite their young age they are all really making ripples in the music world”

Photo: album artwork

Album: Diet Cig — Swear I’m Good At This

Personal and political blur together in an infectiously energetic debut album that appropriately develops the pop-punk duo’s sound, writes Joe Casson

Photo: album artwork

Album: Future Islands — The Far Field

Future Islands fifth album follows their 2014 breakthrough with a somewhat uneven album that both surpasses and falls short of its predecessor, writes Cassie Hyde

Photo: album artwork

Album: Father John Misty — Pure Comedy

On his disappointing third album, Father John Misty comes across as a parody of himself, offering trite social commentary and uninspired music, writes Joe Casson