Latest News:
Manchester Mancunion Logo

Posts Tagged ‘Film Review’

Review: Doctor Sleep

30 years after The Shining’s release, its long-awaited sequel proves, despite some flaws, to be a worthy successor to Stanley Kubrick’s masterpice, writes Carl Fitzgerald

Despite its length, Francois Ozon’s Catholic abuse scandal-based drama By the Grace of God is a beautifully crafted and fascinating portrayal of the effects of trauma, writes Carl Fitzgerald

Review: Werewolf

Adrian Panek’s Werewolf is a grim, but ultimately powerful and moving exploration of humanity under the most dehumanising of circumstances, writes Carl Fitzgerald

Review: Hustlers

Lorene Scafaria’s Hustlers is a revealing, hilarious and brutally honest depiction of stripping from a uniquely female perspective, writes Izzy Sharp

Review: The Farewell

Writer Will Johnston reviews The Farewell, the much-anticipated A24 film starring Awkwafina

Photo: Gage Skidmore @ Wikimedia Commons.

Review: Dumbo

Tim Burton and Disney team up to bring another animated classic to life in live action, with mixed results of solid moments and missed opportunities

Photo: Jim Toscano

A round of short films courtesy of the Manchester Film Festival provide a heartfelt and hilarious look into extraordinary people and events in modern life

Photo: Beatriz Posada Alonso @WikimediaCommons

Review: Capernaum

Nadine Labako has delivered an Oscar nominated gem of a film which holds all power to account with a deeply emotional story, writes Carl Fitzgerald

Review: Non-Fiction

Olivier Assayas’ Paris-set comedy is a charming look at the world of professional writing, but struggles to fully escape cliché, writes Georgina Davidson

Photo: Jay Tamboli @Flickr

Review: Countdown

Carl Fitzgerald reviews the painfully unscary poorly made and cartoonishly misjudged urban legend phone-horror movie

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Review: The Goldfinch

Jasmine Bennett discusses whether or not The Goldfinch is as much of a masterpiece as its namesake

Jason Cabell’s directorial debut, Running with the Devil, is gifted with a dream concpet and an all-star cast, but still leaves a lot to be desired, writes Carl Fitzgerald

Authorised Press Image

Despite having a stellar cast, Killers Anonymous only just avoids being consigned to cinematic oblivion

Photo: John Bauer @WikimediaCommons

Review: Border

The new film from Ali Abassi is expertly crafted and a detailed deep dive into complex questions of the modern world, fronted by fantastic performances

Photo: MIH83 @PixaBay

A sluggish and derivative possession-horror that’s only amusing so as to think of better films it steals from which you could be watching instead.